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Featured Photographs
Visit Phillyhistory.org and take a look at our many new additions.
Miss previous feature photos? See more here.

Clean Up Week Parade
N. Broad and Arch Streets

Curbside Clean up during Clean Up Week
809 S. Fifth Street
 
 
 
 

Featured Blog Entry
at www.phillyhistory.org/blog for weekly updates.

Learning for the Real World

Late in the 19th century and early in the 20th, child labor reformers were busy trying to devise a plan for keeping the nations children out of the factories and in the schools for as long as possible. However, the things they were doing to extend the amount of time a child spent in the school system failed to keep all children in school. They wondered why, until the idea was presented that perhaps the children continually left school early because they did not understand the value an education in traditional academic disciplines (writing, math, or foreign language, for example) would have in their everyday lives after they graduated...... read more.

Philadelphia Trade School - Sign Painting
S. 12th and Locust Streets

Philadelphia Trade School - Classroom
S. 12th and Locust Streets

 
 


A Big Thank You to
The Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission

The PHMC has awarded an Archives and Records Management Grant to the Department of Records to support digital scanning of photos. The $14,223 will be used to support our archives interns in 2007. Thank you.



How Philly Works: Streets as Barometers of Urban Life
October 6, 2006 - September, 2007



How Philly Works: Streets as Barometers of Urban Life includes paintings, photographs, prints, objects and documents, using William Penn’s vision for Philadelphia to explore street activity over 300 years. Drawn almost exclusively from the City Records Department, individual City Departments and the Atwater Kent Museum, the exhibition showcases the recent program of the Records Department to make its holdings available on the Internet. The exhibition features the Philadelphia City Charter, drafted by Penn in 1701, the wampum belt believed to have been given to Penn by the Lenape tribe, a waywiser from 1750 used to measure consistent city blocks, historic regulatory measures from the Department of Licenses and Inspections, and police paraphernalia from the late 1800s. How Philly Works will be on exhibition until September, 2007.

Atwater Kent Museum of Philadelphia is at 15 South 7th Street, one block west of Independence Hall, between Market and Chestnut Street. It is open for general admission Wednesday-Sunday from 1-5 p.m. School and group tours are scheduled everyday from 10:00 a.m.- 4:00 p.m. Admission is: adults, $5; seniors and children 13-17, $3; members and children 12 and under, free. The Museum Store is open Monday and Tuesday from 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. and Wednesday through Sunday from 1-5 p.m.

For program information call 215.685.4830 or visit www.philadelphiahistory.org.

 
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