Category Archives: Historic Sites

Apothecary Roses of Germantown

The Wyck mansion, located in the Germantown section of Philadelphia, is not just one of the oldest structures in the city, but is also home to the oldest surviving rose garden in the nation. The first section of the dwelling dates to 1690, when Germantown was a satellite of the new city of Phialdelphia. For […]
Also posted in Behind the Scenes | Leave a comment

The Autocrat and the Engineer (Part II)

As the capital of Imperial Russia, St. Petersburg was a city of many palaces.  Some belonged to the Romanov family, such as Peterhof, the Winter Palace, the Pavlovsk Palace, the Anichkov Palace, and Tsarskoe Selo.  Others belonged to wealthy Russian nobles, such as the Yusapov, Beloselskiy, and Stroganov clans. Many had been constructed in the 18th century, […]
Also posted in Behind the Scenes, Events and People | Leave a comment

The Autocrat and the Engineer (Part I)

In view of the interest and importance at the present time of everything which relates to the development of railroading, it is well to remember what has been done in America to lay the foundations of the locomotive industry, and, therefore, we feel that it is desirable to recall the extent to which the design of the modern locomotive is […]
Also posted in Events and People, Neighborhoods | Leave a comment

Andrew Eastwick: Savior of Bartram’s Garden

  Famed Bartram’s Garden, homestead of Philadelphia’s 18th century botanist kids bounce house John Bartram, is going through a renaissance today. The gardens are lushly planted and the main buildings restored.  The parking lot is full on warm summer Saturdays. New bike trails connect this pastoral sanctuary to Center City and University City.  The renovated […]
Also posted in Behind the Scenes, Snapshots of History | Leave a comment

Dr. Kirkbride’s Country Cure

Before it became a fashionable streetcar suburb, West Philadelphia was infamous as as place where the city’s indigent, and mentally ill were warehoused out of sight and mind. As historian Robert Morris Skaler wrote, “if one was incurable, insane, consumptive, blind, orphaned, crippled, destitute, or senile, one would most likely end up in a faith-based charitable […]
Also posted in Behind the Scenes | 1 Comment

Joe Sweeney: Legend of Boathouse Row (Part III)

After that rough introduction the to LaSalle rowing program, Joe kids bounce house Sweeney did come back to Crescent, again and again. He discovered that coaches Joe Dougherty and Tom “Bear” Curran were not just founts of rowing wisdom, but also had some remarkable rowing stories from their younger days. One of Joe Sweeney’s favorites […]
Also posted in Behind the Scenes, Events and People, Snapshots of History | Comments closed

Joe Sweeney: Legend of Boathouse Row (Part II)

After spending several years in the Navy, Joe Sweeney kids bounce house came back commercial obstacle course to Philadelphia in the late 1950s to go to college on the GI Bill. His widowed mother continued to work as a nurse, rising to become the head of Student Health Services at the University of Pennsylvania. The […]
Also posted in Behind the Scenes, Events and People, Snapshots of History | Comments closed

West Philadelphia’s Satterlee Hospital (Part I)

Excerpt kids bounce house from “The Wound-Dresser” by Walt Whitman Bearing the bandages, water and sponge, Straight and swift to my wounded I go, Where they lie on the ground after the battle brought in, Where their priceless blood reddens the grass, the ground, Or to the rows of the hospital tent, or under the […]
Also posted in Events and People, Neighborhoods | Comments closed

Campo’s Delicatessen and Our Lady of Loreto (Part II)

To read Part I, click here.  In the 1930s, Ferdinando’s son young Ambrose went to kids bounce house work at his uncle’s butcher’s shop in South Philadelphia, which he would eventually take over. Because few families owned cars during the lean years of the Great Depression, most Philadelphians still shopped for food in their neighborhoods, […]
Also posted in Neighborhoods, Snapshots of History | Comments closed

Campo’s and Our Lady of Loreto (Part I)

The oldest surviving cookbook, De re coquinaria (On Cookery), was compiled by Marcus Gavius Apicius in the first century A.D., the high water mark of the Roman Empire.  Each region of Italy has been reveling in its own favorites ever since: “pane con la milza” (open-faced pork spleen sandwich) from Sicily, coretello (minced lamb and lamb innards) […]
Also posted in Behind the Scenes, Neighborhoods | Comments closed
  • Categories

  • Archives